We are the Pharaoh, we uphold Ma’at

This is an interesting article about how we are all, each of us, a King. I found it when VeggieWolf reblogged it on her blog.You can read the article for further details, but I thought I’d connect it to my own thoughts. Go ahead. Go read it. I’ll wait. Here’s the link to the original post: Hills of the Horizon: A Defense of Sacred Kingship

So, as someone who works with Aset, one of whose epithets is “Maker of Kings”, I share many sentiments within this article. I do feel that, as moderns, using the King/Pharaoh as a symbol for what any of us can be in reaching our potential is apt. As the King /Pharaoh was, at least according to what the state material would tell us, literally Ra/Heru on earth, so can we also be Ra/Heru on earth. The Netjeru are as much us as they are the world about us. For me, Aset is one who can help you to plunge the depths of your mind and development, discover your desires and demons and strengths and weaknesses, and mold you into the Pharaoh you can become.

As much as the King/Pharaoh was responsible for upholding Ma’at, so are we responsible for upholding Ma’at. The King/Pharaoh works through us; we can all become Kings/Pharaohs when we uphold Ma’at and strive for our potential (I’ve read that even the ancients eventually democratized the afterlife, allowing all people to access eternity after death. I think its an interesting idea to extent the other perks and responsibilities as well). This article focuses on social justice, but there are other aspects of Ma’at as well (well, in my version of Ma’at. YMMV, of course 😀 ). There is “personal Ma’at”, which is akin to learning to accept and understand your inner “demons” or “shadow”, learning your strengths and weaknesses, learning who you are, what you want to be, and how to get there, learning to be disciplined but also self-compassionate, and striving to be contented and “successful”, however you define those things. There is also “ecological Ma’at”, which entails doing your part to either help the environment/world you live in or avoid doing harm. I’m sure there are many other forms/versions of Ma’at…things that are “orderly” or most beneficial for all persons. But in any arena, while we usually aren’t entirely responsible for the outcome of whether Ma’at is established/upheld, we are connected enough to the world about us to have an influence.

In short, we can all “bloom”. We all affect the world around us. We are one way the gods can uphold Ma’at in this world, because the gods are within and around us. In a sense, as the Pharaoh was seen as a Netjer, so are we Netjeru.

I am very much reminded of part of St. Teresa of Avila’s poem, “Christ Has No Body”.

Christ has no body but yours,
No hands, no feet on earth but yours,
Yours are the eyes with which he looks
Compassion on this world,
Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good,
Yours are the hands, with which he blesses all the world.
Yours are the hands, yours are the feet,
Yours are the eyes, you are his body.
Christ has no body now but yours,
No hands, no feet on earth but yours,
Yours are the eyes with which he looks
compassion on this world.
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.

Intuitive Understanding and “Divination”

Atheopaganism

I read Tarot cards. Not as much as I used to, but I still do it.

I don’t think of it as “fortune telling”. I think of the Tarot as a magnificently complex set of symbols from which I randomly choose, creating therefrom a narrative which draws up my intuitive understanding of a situation or question and illuminates it in complex, interesting and often surprising ways. In a way, Tarot is like a Rorschach test, only with much richer set of available symbols and a long history of interpretation and lore.

Besides, it’s really, really cool. Tarot by candlelight, with a bit of incense? You won’t feel much witchier than that, short of dancing naked around a fire.

In the Atheist community, I see a lot of hyperfocus on rationality, and discounting of intuitive thinking (and of emotion, generally). What cannot be logically explained is often dismissed entirely, to a fault…

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